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The End

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'No!' said I, looking from face to face.

The EndBy the common consent of all mankind who have read, poetry takes the highest place in literature. That nobility of expression, and all but divine grace of words, which she is bound to attain before she can make her footing good, is not compatible with prose. Indeed it is that which turns prose into poetry. When that has been in truth achieved, the reader knows that the writer has soared above the earth, and can teach his lessons somewhat as a god might teach. He who sits down to write his tale in prose makes no such attempt, nor does he dream that the poet’s honour is within his reach — but his teaching is of the same nature, and his lessons all tend to the same end. By either, false sentiments may be fostered; false notions of humanity may be engendered; false honour, false love, false worship may be created; by either, vice instead of virtue may be taught. But by each, equally, may true honour, true love; true worship, and true humanity be inculcated; and that will be the greatest teacher who will spread such truth the widest. But at present, much as novels, as novels, are bought and read, there exists still an idea, a feeling which is very prevalent, that novels at their best are but innocent. Young men and women — and old men and women too — read more of them than of poetry, because such reading is easier than the reading of poetry; but they read them — as men eat pastry after dinner — not without some inward conviction that the taste is vain if not vicious. I take upon myself to say that it is neither vicious nor vain. "Doctor Walter! That is an order." Drax's voice of controlled anger broke in on Bond's thoughts as he stood fingering the sharp leading edge of the tail of one of the Columbite fins. "Back to work. We have wasted enough time." "My momma had six girls. Called them all after flowers. Violet, Rose, Cherry, Pansy, and Lily. Then when I came, she couldn't think of any more flower names so she called me Artificial." Tiffy waited for him to laugh. When he didn't, she went on. "When I went to school they all said it was a wrong name and laughed at me and shortened it to Tiffy and that's how I've stayed." "Did you say grand slam in clubs?" he asked, looking curiously at his obviously drunken opponent, "Well, it's your funeral. What do you say, Max?"

'Ready, my dear Jane,' returned my mother. 'Good-bye, Davy. You are going for your own good. Good-bye, my child. You will come home in the holidays, and be a better boy.'

‘Yes, a fine idea,’ repeated Zina?da. ‘Is life such a festive affair? Just look about you. . . . Is it nice, eh? Or do you imagine I don’t understand it, and don’t feel it? It gives me pleasure — drinking iced water; and can you seriously assure me that such a life is worth too much to be risked for an instant’s pleasure — happiness I won’t even talk about.’

James Bond, to cover his confusion, walked across to the calendar, verified that he had in fact pierced the fifteenth, pulled out the knife and slipped it back in his trouser pocket. He turned and said, 'What makes you think so?'